Head of Strategic Sales Nick Cordero asks why it is that he’ll open one email and then delete 5 others!

I have had an iPhone 4s for two years now. I resisted for as long as I could and held onto my Droid like it was still cool and very functional, however now that I have joined the revolution I see why people are making the switch.
iPhone v 3310
Nokia 3310: No emails. But it did have Snake…

At first I thought the apps where the same and the experience was the same on the droid phones as with the iPhone. I will admit now I could not have been more wrong. This really shines through when looking at my emails and how I have noticed that I check my email way more on my phone then on the computer even when the computer is on right in front of me.


Every Email in One Place

The mail app on the iPhone that allows me to have my Gmail, Yahoo and work email all under one app is priceless. No signing into view all the different mails.

Just clicking one button and then selecting which account I would like to check. Let’s also not forget that when I turn the phone on it shows me that I have mail waiting that I have to look at…


Anyway. Enough about how cool Email is on the iPhone. 

Why do some of my emails that I receive get looked at and some do not.

Well one would first think it would be the brand that the email is coming from and in many cases you would be right. Yet there are many emails that come from brands I love that just get deleted right away. So what is the most important thing to get me to open an email? Subject lines.

Here are some very cool statistics on reading emails on your smartphone:

Email Usage on Smartphones

Subject lines are really the start to the experience and you have to make sure that these pull the customer in. I found that you will want to remember these things when writing a subject line for your email campaign:

  • Attention Grabbing: Will the reader notice it in a busy inbox?
  • Effective: Is the promised message valuable to the reader?
  • Ultra-specific: Does the reader know what’s being promised?
  • Distinctive: Is the promised message compelling and remarkable?
  • Persuasive: Does the reader feel the need to read now?

Keeping these in mind when thinking of the subject line will help to grab the reader’s attention to make sure to maximize the click/press ratio.