Last week, SaleCycle took part in a webinar with Trustpilot, looking at ways websites can use existing customers to help acquire new ones. 

 

Key Highlights

In the webinar Salecycle’s Jack Ford and Peter Simpson from Trustpilot look at ways in which website can use existing customers to help convert new ones, looking at some examples of brands that have used these tactics successfully.


Awareness

Ratings used in various ways can help to attract customers at various stages of the customer journey, in this case the awareness stage.

One example is Purple Bricks, which uses reviews at every stage in the customer journey, from ratings shown in search and PPC results, to landing pages.


Interest

The webinar also looks at the interest stage, and how websites can use reviews to convert browsers into buyers.

Indeed, Trustpilot found from A/B testing that conversion rates are 30% to 50% higher when reviews are displayed on-site.

It’s about providing that reassurance that means visitors are confident in making a purchase.

A great example of this comes from Modcloth, which provide detailed reviews which look at factors such as as the fit of garments.

This ensures that customers can find more information that helps them find the correct fit, and deals with a key issue that drives returns in fashion.


Post-Purchase

The process doesn’t end once visitors have converted, this is where the gathering of reviews can help to inform businesses.

All reviews, positive and negative, can help businesses. Negative reviews can help by raising awareness of issues which can then be fixed to improve performance.

Sites like Amazon use reviews and customer data in the post-purchase phase, using customer data for product recommendations for example.


Using Customer Data

By using the data and feedback you gather, customers can help you to learn where you may need to improve to drive more conversions.

For example, abandonment surveys can be used to find out why customers didn’t buy from you.

Perhaps customers from a specific region aren’t finding the payment option they want to use, or there’s a fault in checkout. This information can help retailers to identify precise problems and make the necessary improvements.